What causes a clutch in a manual transmission to burn out. What actually happens inside the case?

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How does the eventual wear of the clutch occur?



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5 Responses to What causes a clutch in a manual transmission to burn out. What actually happens inside the case?

  1. pedro7of9 says:

    the clutch plate rubs on the pressure plate and flywheel when engaging…friction equals wear

  2. Cowboy P says:

    Slippage (or more specifically, the friction that is created by it) is what wears a clutch. And guess what? Clutches are designed to be able to slip when they need to.

    Alright, since some arse decided to give me a thumbs down, and I’m back home, I will elaborate:

    Fully engaged and ‘fully disengaged’ are the only places at where a clutch doesn’t slip, create friction, burn, and wear out (the wear process). Everywhere in between these two points it will be, at varying rates depending on how close to the sweet spot you have the pedal depressed.

    So the longer you leave the clutch partially engaged, the longer it is being worn. You let it slip for too long and you’ll roast the clutch and glaze the pressure plate like a thanksgiving turkey. Solution is simple; use the clutch smoothly but promptly, don’t kick the clutch in an attempt to shift really quickly because you’ll bugger the throwout bearings, and learn how to shift gears properly – hell, learn how to rev match and double de clutch too while you’re at it. They’re good skills to have.

    You can also encounter wear just by sitting at an interesection with the car in gear and clutch in for too long, but this isn’t as bad as riding the clutch while you’re driving.

    But don’t worry, like I said before clutches are meant to slip (to some degree).

  3. The clutch is a wear item just like brakes. The material it is made from rubs on the flywheel to engage the engine to the transmission. Everytime you push in and release the clutch pedal, a little of this material wears away. How fast this happens depends on the ability of the operator. Overreving your engine or riding the clutch accelerate the wear.

  4. bur p says:

    the cause of most clutch wear is what is called riding the clutch, where a driver sitting at somewhere like traffic lights depressing the clutch peddle to a point where you do not move forward or backwards on a slope without using the hand/parking brake, or resting your foot on the clutch peddle while driving, but general wear and tear from changing gear is normally minimal and with average annual mileage driving a clutch should last 10 + years

  5. baldie says:

    for 1 thing if you have a rear main seal leaking then oil can get on the clutch and ruin the clutch and another thing is riding with your foot on the clutch and jumping the clutch can roughen it up.